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becomes, can bashar al-assad handle fighting from in his country the rebels as well as outside of his country from turkey? that could be enough to crush the regime? >>guest: there is is no doubt bashar al-assad wants to keep turkey out of this. that is why we see not just syria apologizing but the russians who are the main diplomatic protector coming in and trying to contain this situation. what you see from the west, also, frankly, is a desire to contain the actual spillover here, the fighting here, and move this into the united nations security council to try to take advantage of this, to spur action in the council. >>trace: you use the word "contain" and that brings the next question. are you concerned this could become a regional war and spread in what really is a very unsettled part of world? >>guest: well, it is already more regionalized than people realize. you have this strike in turkey. it is not the first strike in turkey. we have seen strikes in lebanon. there have been a flow of refugees? jordan and turkey. we have iranian forces and ed in the fighting. as time goes on we
inside their country to a conflict with turkey. jon: bashar al-assad's forces have enough of a problem just containing, just battling their own population, the rebel fighters within syria. if they have to take on a force from outside, namely turkey, are they going to be able to handle that? >> no, they could not. quite frankly, i don't think they can handle the rebels if we gave them the weapons that they desire and some of the information that they desperately need, not even to speak of a no-fly zone, if we just armed them properly i think the syrian military would have significant problems with the rebels as we've already seen. jon: but then you wind up with the question of who fills the vacuum. if bashar al-assad were to fall who fills the vacuum, and can we be certain that the rebels are going to wind up being our friends? >> well, we cannot. i don't think anybody would be able to predict that, and certainly what we've seen in egypt and also in libya tells you just how challenging this is. we do know what we have there now. we have a brutal dictatorship where people are socially, p
to be syrian army officers and assad regime security forces. leland vittert is live in our middle east bureau with the latest. leland? >> reporter: gregg, this really shows how sophisticated these attacks are becoming. these bombings were sophisticated on number of levels, happening within minutes of each other, well-coordinated. not only that, the bombers were able to get in a very secure part of aleppo near the syrian headquarters. lastly the bombs themselves were well-made and clearly devastating in their effect. images coming from syrian state tv shows the same kind of damage to full blocks of aleppo in the government controlled areas. same kind of damage we're seeing in the rebel controlled areas coming from those deadly attacks with certainian -- syrian artillery. this points much more to jihadist movements rather than homegrown rebel fighters, fighters coming out of places like libya and iraq with expertise and also al qaeda linkage what we're seeing here in syria. this fits much more with the syrian government narrative going forward which complicates, things, gregg. you know it used
far we heard assad evil, rebels good. now things look much more complicated and more civilians end up dieing from this violence that keeps going back and forth. bill: what are the reports of those killed since this war started? >> reporter: you are talking north of 20,000 people, bill. not only do you have the people killed. you have the civilians and four or five,000 syrian soldiers and syrian rebels killed. but hundreds of thousands of refugees, people who left their homes with only the clothes on their back in turkey. we are now approaching winter up on the northern border of syria. it is going to get very, very tough for these syrian refugees who are now in these tents as winter sets in. we are talking about temperatures now in the 20s. and also snow in the northern mountains in syria. bill: thank you, leland. leland vittert live in jerusalem. jamie: president obama and governor mitt romney are set to square off in their first face-to-face debate. megyn kelly will join us live with new polling. bill: there is a manhunt for the killer of this border patrol agent? arizona. >> he was
to fight bashar al-assad's oppression of them. one by one he'll go down and argue that barack obama and the obama administration have been quote, leading from behind and essentially passive in american foreign policy, and in that vane have relinquished the u.s. role of strength and security and moral leadership around the world. patti ann: carl, do you see a change in mitt romney's approach to foreign policy, as far as the campaign goes? >> reporter: well, the attack on the consulate in benghazi now more than three weeks ago, the romney campaign has been saying since that point that there would be a major foreign policy speech delivered and that it would be quite critical of president obama. but the truth is, his primary emphasis, romney's is jobs and the economy. they are making sure that he has got all the presidential issues, commander-in-chief being obviously a key one touched on, and there is in issue of questions about his foreign policy experience. he's a one-term governor of massachusetts and the obama campaign is out with a new ad that will run only in virginia but it's ver
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5